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Lupe

Since usability researchers put their focus more on user satisfaction, this fuzzy aspect of men-machine interaction got different names: emotional design (Norman, 2004), hedonic resp. non instrumental quality of products (Hassenzahl, 2003, 2006) as well as user experience and relating to positive experiences "Joy of Use".

Hassenzahl et al. (2001) state that "Joy of Use" results from excellent usability (ease of use). If an interactive system can be used effectively and efficiently, the user experiences a positive feeling.

Hassenzahl‘s later model of user experience (2003) claims that user‘s pleasure and satisfaction caused by hedonic qualities of products relies on stimulation, identification and evocation. According to Hassenzahl, stimulation results from novelty, change and challenge. Identity includes attitudes, social standing and group belonging. Evocation means that products can provoke memories concerning individually important past events, relationships or thoughts. Through this they can have a symbolic value for users, so as e.g. souvenirs.

According to Hatscher (2001) joy of use is the joyful experience of the quality of interaction and possibilities for a single user in a particular context which becomes manifest in a motivated use of the software which is adequate to goals and interests. It is the consequence of excellent functioning and user oriented aesthetical design.

Burmester, Hassenzahl & Koller (2002) understand "Joy of Use" as the fun and joy evoked by the use of interactive products.

Following Reeps (2004), "Joy of Use" can be characterized as the positive, subjective feeling a user has while using a product. Reeps points out that this always depend on the context and person. If the design of a product considers "Joy of Use", it serves a bigger creative power to the user and strengthens his/her interest, trust and satisfaction. This stimulates an intensified use.

Logan (1994) specifies emotional usability as the degree to which a product is desirable or serves a need beyond the functional objective.

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